Tuesday, November 18, 2014

52 ANCESTORS in 52 WEEKS, No. 47: Richard TREAT, 1584-1668/9

Following the challenge from Amy Johnson Crow to write a post weekly, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, here is my 47th installment, Richard TREAT, 1584-1668/9, my 8th great-grandfather on my mother's side.

My direct line from Richard Treat(1): Robert (Gov.) Robert Treat (2), Joseph (Capt) Treat (3), Samuel Treat (4), Samuel Peet Treat (5), Anna Treat (6), Charles Giles Graves (7), Clara Augusta Graves (8), Marguerite Josephine Terwilliger (9), Mary Marguerite Kuhn (10), Celia Gillespie (me).

Richard TREAT is another of the early New England settlers in my mother's ancestral line, having arrived approximately 1635.  Note that in England, this TREAT ancestral name is directly related to the TROTT surname, this group of ancestors having changed spelling in America shortly after settling in the New England Colonies. Another group of TROTT immigrants in New England did not change the spelling and are likely relatives - not as yet proven with DNA and genealogy research.

Richard TREAT's parents were Robert & Honora TROTT; he was one of 5 children attributed to this couple who lived in Pitminster, Somerset, England. Richard was baptised 28 Aug 1584 in Pitminster, and his wife, Alice GAYLORD (Gaylaud, var.) was baptised there 10 May 1595.  They married 27 Apr 1615 in Pitminster, and they emigrated from Somerset after the death of both Richard's parents: Robert in 1598/99, and Honora on 17 Sep 1627, and very shortly after the birth of their youngest child, Katharine. 

Richard & Alice TREAT had 11 children baptized in Pitminster, but 2 died before the family emigrated. The Treat family settled first in Dorchester, Massachusetts before moving to Wethersfield, Connecticut, where they remained:
        A first son, Robert, apparently died as an infant
   1.  Honor, bap 19 Mar 1615/16; m. John Deming in CT, 10 children
   2.  Joanna, bap 24 May 1618, d. Oct 1694; m. Lieut. John Hollster; 8 children
   3.  Sarah, bap 3 Dec 1620, d. after Jun 1673; m. Matthew Canfield, 9 children
   4.  Richard, bap 9 Sep 1623, d. 1693 Newark NJ; m. Sarah Coleman, 4 children; apparently an alternate date of 9 Jan 1621/22.
   5.  Robert [ancestor], bap 23 Feb 1623/4 or 1624/25, d. 12 Jul 1710; m. 25 Dec 1646 to Jane TAPP, 8 children [Governor of Connecticut]
   6.  Elizabeth, bap 25 Jul 1627; m. George Wolcott, 4 children
   7.  Susanna, bap 8 Oct 1629, d. bef 7 Nov 1705; m. 1652 to Lieut. Robert Webster, 5 children
   8.  Alice, bap 16 Feb  1630/31, d. 2 Aug 1633 Pitminster Eng.
   9.  James (Lieut), bap 20 Jul 1634, d. 12 Feb 1708/09; m. 26 Jan 1664/65 to Rebecca Lattimer, 9 known children
 10.  Catharine, bap 29 Jun 1637;  m. 19 Nov 1655 to Rev. William Thompson

Richard was one of the Patentees of the Charter of Connecticut  to King Charles II. Written in May 1661, it was taken to England by their current Governor, John Winthrop, and finally approved 1 May 1662.  Richard was Deputy to the Connecticut General Court 1644-1658, Magistrate or Assistant Magistrate between 1657-1665; he was on Governor Winthrop's Council in 1663-1664. He left a sizeable estate when he died, detailed in his will.

Richard wrote his will 13 Feb 1668/9 in Milford, New Haven, CT, and is said to have died a year later, on 3 Mar 1669/70 in Wethersfield.  His wife, Alice died shortly afterwards. Although he is 'known' to have been buried in the Wethersfield Village Cemetery, there is no headstone left standing. 

If you have information or corrections, please do not hesitate to contact me through calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below.  Thanks for stopping by to read this very brief history. 

4 comments:

Peter Barbella said...

Very nice!

Celia Lewis said...

Thanks for visiting, Peter. This year-long challenge is making me research ancestors I haven't looked at for several years! Cheers.

Marshall Stack said...

I am also a descendant of Richard and Robert Trott/Treat. Not long ago, I sent an email to the church of St. Andrew and St. Mary in Pitminster, where the Trott family worshipped, and received this reply explaining why the family left England:

"You may already know it was from here that Richard Trott (later Treat) emigrated with his wife and 9 children in 1637 and at the age of 53 to the New World. There is a plaque in the church which commemorates this.

You may also know that what precipitated this momentous decision was a row about a church tax which was levied on parishioners for the recasting of the bells. Richard objected to this, stating his fervent belief that “ we need no bells to worship God”.

England was of course riven by opposing religious beliefs, and having so recently adopted Protestantism following Henry 8's split with Rome in order to divorce Catherine of Aragon, there was anxiety that Charles 1, married to Henrietta Maria of Spain, might take England back towards Roman Catholicism."

My lineage to Richard Trott:
Richard Trott - Gov. Robert Treat - Rev. Samuel Treat - Joseph Treat - Capt. John Treat - Capt. Samuel Treat - Lucius Junius Brutus Treat - Amanda Treat - Lucy M. Lane - Walter Raymond Simpson - Walter Raymond Simpson Jr. - Milton Treat Simpson - Me.

Not sure if you're aware of this, but we count actor Treat Williams and signer of the Declaration Of Independence Robert Treat Paine among our extensive family.

Celia Lewis said...

Marshall - thank you so much for this wonderful detailed note about our TREAT/TROTT ancestors.
Wish I could find an email for you so I could thank you for this helpful note.
My lineage: Richard Trott - Gov. Robert Treat - Capt. Joseph Treat - Samuel Treat - Samuel Peet Treat - Anna Treat - Charles Giles Graves - Clara Augusta Graves - Marguerite Josephine Terwilliger - Mary Marguerite Kuhn - to me.
Cheers!

Welcome!

Family, friends, and others - I hope you enjoy these pages about our ancestors and their lives. Genealogy has become somewhat of an obsession, more than a hobby, and definitely a wonderful mystery to dig into and discover. Enjoy my writing, and contact me at celia.winky at gmail dot com if you have anything to add to the stories. ... Celia Lewis