Wednesday, July 28, 2021

Wordless Wednesday: Cousins

 

It's so difficult for me to keep this absolutely wordless!  

Photo taken in 1946 on steps at 2033 Victoria Street, in cold weather.  

I'm in bottom right holding out an apple to whoever is taking the photo, little cousin Wendy watching me, and above, Leita watching the photo-taker, and Derek [Wendy's brother] who looks as if he's saying something!  

Wish we'd taken more photos like this... 

Tuesday, July 6, 2021

#52Ancestors: Jacob Jansen Van ETTEN 1632-1693, Netherlands to New Amsterdam

 Another post in the year-long challenge, #52Ancestors by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow. Although I am behind, every post is another post! Today I am sharing information on a very early New Amsterdam settler, Jacob Jansen Van ETTEN.  His surname Jansen indicates his father's first name was Jan/John. Because there were many Jacob Jansen persons, Van Etten was added, and shows he came originally from the small town of Etten, southeast of Amsterdam. Above is a map of Etten in the Netherlands. His surname is written a number of ways, sometimes as one word. My standardized surname spelling is Van ETTEN. Jacob is my 8th great-grandfather, 9th to my children, and 10th to my grandchildren.

Jacob's parents might possibly be Johannes Marinessen & Wilhelmina Hoannes from Etten - this has not yet been verified. I have no further information on Jacob's family of origin.

Jacob Van ETTEN, b. 1632, came over to New Amsterdam about 1659 under a 6 year contract, with another man, Aert Pietersen Tack. Aert was about 6 years older than Jacob, and quickly married a very young girl, Annetje ADRIANSE, (b. 29 Aug 1645), on Aug 14, 1660. They had 2 children: Cornelius Aertszen abt 1661, and Grietje abt 1663. After Grietje was born, Aert abandoned his wife and children and returned to the Netherlands, where he was known to have immediately married again, and  to have several children with this second 'wife.' Because this was known information to the authorities, Annetje was allowed to divorce him immediately. 

On Oct 21, 1664, there is a record in Kingston Records [in New York Albany Deeds] of a request from Jacob Jansen Van Etten, Aert PietersenTack's "head farmhand to be paid out from Aert Pietersen Tack's estate," per a bill he sent in earlier. Several months later, on Feb 3, 1665, he again requests that his wages from working the farm be taken out of Aert's estate.  

What a very challenging time. Remember that the British took over the small Dutch colony, New Amsterdam and the other small towns along the Hudson River, in 1664. I'm wondering when Jacob was paid what was owed to him.   

And then what happened? Yes, you've probably guessed: Jacob, Aert's work partner, married Annetje, 11 Jan 1665, taking on her two small children, Cornelius & Grietje. Tanslation of the marriage record in the Old Dutch Church Register [found in the NY Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol.30, p52]:
"1665, 11 Jan.  Jacob Jansen, young man of Etten in Brabant [Netherlands] and Annetje Arians of Amsterdam, deserted wife of Aaert Pietersen Tack, both  residing here [in Wiltwyck now Kingston]. First publication of Banns, 28 Dec 1664, second 4 Jan, third 11 Jan 1665."

Children of Jacob & Annetje follow, with only limited research on the children: 
   1.   Jan Van Etten, bap Jan 3, 1666; m. abt 1690 to Jannetje Roosa, dau of Capt Arie Roosa; second, June 22, 1731 to Cornelia Van Aaken, widow of Jan Chammers; 10 children 
   2.   Sytie Jacobsz Van ETTEN (ancestor), bap 1668, Kingston, New York; m. 1685 in Kingston, NY to Jan EVERTSEN [var. Evertz] whose surname changed shortly afterwards to TERWILLIGER; 12 children
   3.   Adriaen, bap Mar 25, 1669; m. Catharine Crom
   4.   Pieter, b.est 1672; m. Eva de Hooges
   5.   Petronella, b abt 1675; m. Aldert Roos
   6.   Heiltie, bap Apr 21 1679; m. William Van Vredenburg
   7.   Emanuel, bap Dec 29, 1681; m. Antje de Hooges   
   8.   Tietie, bap Feb 24, 1684; m. Evert Roosa
   9.   Jacobus, bap May 2, 1686; m. Rebekka Roosa
  10.  Gessje, bap Dec 25, 1688; m. Jacob Decker

I was able to find a few documents about Jacob Jansen Van ETTEN. He signed the 1676 petition to Governor Andros for his assistance in procuring for them a minister at Esopus [early name for area which became Kingston NY] - particularly wanting a minister who could preach both in English and Dutch.  In addition, his name is found on a roll of the names and surnames of those who took the oath of allegiance, 1st day of September, 1689.  

However I have yet to find a death record or a gravestone/cemetery listing. I have seen a date of 1693 for his death, in Hurley, New York, about 8 or 9 miles away [abt 14km], but I haven't found a verifying document or historical note. So his death is unverified, but possible. No will or probate as well. More research to do.

Annetje ADRIANSE went to live with one of their children, and died in 1717, in Rhinebeck, Dutchess, New York. Rhinebeck is on the east side of the Hudson River, so quite close to Hurley, New York, where the children were born and raised. Again, I have yet to find a will/probate, a gravestone or, a death registration for her.

                                   -- / -- / -- / -- / -- / -- / -- / -- / -- / 

If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is not letting me "reply" to your comments. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented! You truly make my day!! 

Sunday, June 13, 2021

#52Ancestors: John HUDSON 1736-1789, Pennsylvania

Another post in the year-long challenge, #52Ancestors by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow. Although I am  behind, every post is another post! Today I am sharing information on John  HUDSON, my 4th greatgrandfather on our KUHN lines, 5th greatgrandfather to our children, and 6th greatgrandfather to our grandchildren. There is very little information to be found about John HUDSON/HUTSON, partly as there are a number of Hudson/Hutson men all with same names, generation after generation. However, here is what I've found to date:

John HUDSON was the eldest son the six children of Nicholas HUDSON & Jean/Jane BOWEN, both of whom appear to have emigrated from Wales in the early 1730s. They came to Lancaster County, PA, with John's grandfather George & stepmother Margaret and their adult children.

John's birthdate is estimated 1735/36 in Churchtown, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. [Photo is of 1830s building] No register has been found to date to verify this information. 

On 20 June 1768, John HUDSON married Mary MORGAN [b. 20 Jun 1748], the 4th child of Col. Jacob MORGAN & Rachel PIERSOL. Note that Col. Jacob MORGAN [Sr.] is a well-known Revolutionary War Patriot for whom Morgantown is named.

John and Mary had 7 known children said to have been born in Lancaster county - but note that Morgantown/Caernarvon in Berks county was on the county border with Lancaster County.
 
   1.   Rachel M., b.19 Mar 1769, d. 20 Apr 1849 Pottsville PA; m. 25 Aug 1794
         in  Exeter PA to Morgan A. Lewis [1771-1843]; 9 known children

   2.   Jacob B., b. abt 1772, d. 1823 PA; m. 1798 PA to Elizabeth Porter [-1823];
         no research on children as yet. 

   3.   Nicholas, b. abt 1773, d. 29 Sep 1861 Berks Co. PA; m. 25 Sep 1793
         in PA to Elizabeth McAnnully; no research on children as yet.

   4.   Rebecca [ancestor], b. 16 Mar 1777 Morgantown PA, d. 10 Feb 1844
         Berks Co. PA; m. 17 Jul 1797 Morgantown PA to Edward McCABE
        [1760s Ireland-1814 PA]; 3 known children

   5.   Jonathan [jr.], b. 30 Mar 1781, d. 1820 PA; m. est 1805 to Sarah Williams;
         no further research as yet.

   6.   Sarah, b. 6 Sep 1783; no further research as yet

   7.   George, b. 16 Nov 1785; m. 11 Sep 1808 Reading, Berks PA to
         Anna Williams; no further research as yet.  But note that Jonathan
         married a Williams in same period, likely  sisters. 

John apparently was in Capt. [later Col.] Jacob Morgan's company during the period from March 1777-1780.  

He died unexpectedly, intestate, before 13 May 1789, aged 54 years. His wife Mary was Administer of his account, and she signed a £500 bond to detail a full inventory on 13 May 1789, along with "Jacob Morgan Esquire and Aaron Rattice," who were signatories with her. The inventory [not including his property] signed off on 5 Jun 1789, came to £65 8s 11p. I can find no records of land ownership, but he did have a small farm. There should also be guardians registered for the children, the majority being underage, although I have not found these as yet.

I have not been able to find a cemetery where he might be buried, but it is likely in Caernarvon/Morgantown. 

Mary died only 6 years later, aged 47, in 1795, in Caernarvon, Pennsylvania. Again, I have not found a cemetery burial as yet.  I note that she would have seen only her first child married. No further documents found to date regarding the likely guardians appointed for the younger children.  

John - occasionally listed as Jonathan - does not seem to have left many clues to his life, his interests, nor to how he died so young.  More research is planned, but to date, these are the major points. 

                                     -- / -- / -- / -- / -- / -- / -- / -- / -- / 

If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is not letting me "reply" to your comments. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented! You truly make my day!! 

Monday, May 3, 2021

#52Ancestors: Isaac HUNT 1675-1717, Massachusetts

Another post in the year-long challenge, #52Ancestors by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow. I am way behind, but every post is another post! Today I am sharing information on Isaac HUNT, my children's 7th great-grandfather [joining with their father's RICE line]. 

There were three Isaac HUNT father-sons in a direct genealogical line in Massachusetts from the early 1640s to 1699. It is always challenging trying to hunt for specific men when the families use the same name for their sons, sons name their sons the same name, and on it goes. To be certain I had the correct man, I labelled them in my software program as 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, attached as a "suffix" to their name! The first two married a Mary as well, just to make it a touch more challenging! This post is focused on the middle one, Isaac HUNT 2nd, who apparently married Mary WILLARD.  

I say "apparently" married Mary WILLARD, as the marriage took place in Braintree MA - a fair distance away from Concord MA where he was born, and from Sudbury MA where he and his family lived and later, died. How many Isaac HUNT men could there be marrying a Mary, in these early Massachusetts settlements? For now, I'm accepting the line, which is detailed in several related genealogies, but obviously more research is required. Records of Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Vital and Town Records online from NEHGS [AmericanAncestors.com] site, Probate/Administration records naming children and other relatives [NEHGS site], and Torrey's New England Marriages Prior to 1750 were particularly helpful in this early research project. 

Isaac 2nd HUNT was the 2nd son, and second Isaac son [first Isaac died within a year], of Isaac 1st HUNT & Mary STONE, who married in Concord, May 14, 1667. 

Other children were Hannah, Samuel, and Ebenezer. His father died unexpectedly in Oct 12 1680, aged about 33, when all the children were quite young. His mother married within a few years. 

Isaac 2nd HUNT was a farmer, amassing a large amount of land in Middlesex county.  He married Mary WILLARD, April 26, 1698. They had 9 known children, not all thoroughly  researched nor verified as yet; all born Middlesex county, MA: 
    1.  Isaac 3rd, [ancestor], b. 25 Feb 1699, d. 22 Aug 1781; m. 28 Dec 1721
             Martha GOODENOW, in Essex, MA; 9 known children.
    2.  Thomas, b. 20 Aug 1701, d. 5 Sep 1727, aged 26
    3.  Mary, b. est 1704, d. 16 May 1769
    4.  Ebenezer, b. est 1707, d. 20 Jan 1774
    5.  Samuel, b. 11 Jan 1709
    6.  John, b. 12 Feb 1712, d. 14 Feb 1778
    7.  Simon, b. 20 Apr 1715
    8.  Henry, b. 10 Mar 1716
    9.  Abidah, b. 31 Jul 1717, d. 12 Sep 1789

On Dec 5, 1717, Isaac 2nd HUNT died intestate, meaning no will. Isaac 3rd as the eldest son received a double share of the final reckoning of the estate. The inventory and administration is full of details with notes for the widow's dowry, administration costs, children's guardianship/welfare, and more. It took several years to organize the division of the estate - over £1477 value - and it was formally wrapped up March 27, 1724. 

By the time the estate was settled, Mary WILLARD Hunt had married a second time, to Ebenezer Leland [sr.], on Aug 29, 1721 in Sudbury, Middlesex, MA. Two of her HUNT children married a Leland relative also. 

It is clear I have a great deal more research to do in this family. I have set out research questions and likely sources where I might find some documented details, in addition to identifying which online sites might be useful. 

 -- / -- / -- / -- / -- / -- / -- / -- / -- / 

If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is not letting me "reply" to your comments. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented! You truly make my day!! 

Wednesday, April 28, 2021

#52Ancestors "Great" - 7 of our many-Great-grandparents

Another post in the year-long challenge, #52Ancestors by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow. I am way behind, but every post is another post! Today I am a few weeks late, but am sharing on the theme "GREAT" deciding to look up the earliest ancestors I could document.  Most of these ancestors are my 6th to 9th greatgrandparents.  Almost all of my family names have at least an estimated birthdate based on whatever document I was able to find - a marriage record, a birth record of their child, etc. Some dates were from transcriptions done by local societies or individuals. But for some, the original Parish Registers were online, and wonderfully readable, and the lines were followed step by step. Here are a few of the baptized ones I found, from 1566 up. I've included one of the snippets I took from my downloaded register pages.

BENT, Robert b. 29 Sep 1566 Weyhill, Hampshire, England; m. Annis GOSLING 13 Oct 1589, Weyhill, Hampshire.

BERRINGTON, Agnis [Annis], bap 10 Oct 1568 Datchet, Buckingham, Eng; father's name Thoms. BERRINGTON; m. Robert TINKER 14 Feb 1591 New Windsor, Berkshire, Eng

CLARKE, Thomas bap 7 Mar 1568 Banham, Norfolk, Eng;, father's name Rowland CLARKE; m. Mary CANNE abt 1600, Banham, Norfolk, Eng.  

TROWBRIDGE, John, bap 25 Mar 1570 Taunton Somerset Eng; father's name Thomas TROWBRIDGE; m. 31 Jul 1597 Agnes PROWSE in Tiverton, Somerset Eng.

PROWSE/PROUSE, Agnes, bap 14 Apr 1576 Tiverton Devon Eng; father's name John PROWSE; m. John TROWBRIDGE as above.

SEARLE, Robert, bap 12 May 1576 Honiton Devon Eng; bap with no further info; d. between 20 Mar 1644 and 15 Jan 1646 [Will, Probate]

TREAT, Richard, bap 28 Aug 1584 Pitminster Somerset Eng; father's name Robert TROTT; m. Alice GAYLARD [var.] 27 Apr 1615 Pitminster, Somerset Eng.  Note the TREAT family in the USA were known as TROTT [or variants] in England.

One of my favourite activities is to dig through a Parish Register, page by page by page, trying to read those very early ones from 1500s to early 1700s. Some early registers are very clearly written, neat, tidy, adequate ink on the pen; others are a scribbling splotchy mess. Occasionally the writing was clearly meant to be ornamental for the priest's satisfaction! Amazing variations.

The 1500s Banham Norfolk England Parish Register was a total delight to read. Scanning the pages, I was able to read a significant number of the words and names. Very satisfying. 

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If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is not letting me "reply" to your comments. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day!!

Saturday, March 20, 2021

#52Ancestors: Theresa [Taresy] FRICKER, 1760-1821, Pennsylvania, USA

 Another post in the year-long challenge, #52Ancestors by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow. I am way behind, but every post is another post! Today I am sharing the limited information I have about my 3rd great-grandmother on my mother's paternal line: Theresa FRICKER

Born or baptised apparently 1 May 1760, in Reading, Pennsylvania, of unknown parents, Theresa left almost no records, as did many women of the times. The FRICKER family would have been Roman Catholic, as shown when she married into the KUHN family in 1775, in the Goshenhoppen, Berks, PA chapel. Non-Catholics would have been noted as such in the records. Note that her first name is sometimes spelled as Farasy, Farrasy, Farracy, Tarasey, Tarasy.  

My first note of Theresa FRICKER was seeing her marriage registration, a typed published transcription of Goshenhoppen marriages: p.107


And here come several questions or problems noted in this marriage transcription. Normally witnesses are family members. However I have not yet found a Henry Kuhn of the age to be a witness. John I. KUHN's father and brother had both died by 1775, and all Henry Kuhns in the family were under 18, although one was about 18, a 2nd cousin. I also have no idea of the family of Catharine Erman and her relationship to either of the marriage couple. I've looked up various surname spellings [eg, Ehrman] with several Ehrman, Ermann variations, but no clarity. These two people are good clues, but to date, I have no details to help me place them in the friendship or family circle of this couple. 

Note that women kept their maiden names after marriage, as per the custom of the Dutch. 

Much of the details have come from the Goshenhoppen registers [transcribed/typed], the KUHN obelisk in the Conewago Basilica cemetery, and elderly relatives' records. [photo by permission] 

The twelve children of Theresa FRICKER & John I[Ignatious] KUHN were the following, 2 boys, and 10 girls! 
    1.  Catherine, b. 24 May 1776, bap. 27 May 1776; m. est 1795 to Jacob Grett
    2.  Mary Magdalen, twin, b. 22 May 1778, bap 29 Mar 1789, d. abt 1801; m. est 1800 to John Arthur
    3.   Magdalana, twin, b. 22 May 1778, bap 8 Jun 1778, d. abt 1809, Conewago
    4.  Farracy [Theresa], b. 22 Oct 1780, d. 12 Jan 1847, Pennsylvania; m. est 1805 to Aloysius Owings 1784-1809; 2 boys
    5.  Anna Maria, b. 18 May 1783, bap. 25 May 1783; died young
    6.  Judith, b. 28 Sep 1785, bap. 9 Oct 1785, d. 8 Feb 1848, Abbottstown, Adams, PA; m. Benjamin Fink (1781-1842); 1 girl, 2 boys
    7.  Anna Appolonia, b. 17 May 1791, bap 20 May 1791, d. 12 Dec 1879 Gettysburg, Adams, PA; m. 10 Oct 1826 to Georg Richter; 2 boys
    8.  Margareta, b. 6 Mar 1794, d. 24 Jan 1874 Fort Seneca OH; m. 2 Feg 1817 Conewago Chapel PA to Philippus Staub, 4 boys, 6 girls
    9.  Elizabeth, b. est 1796 Conewago PA, d. 11 May 1852; m. est 1820 to Eusebius Owings
  10.  John, b. 14 Oct 1797, d.30 Mar 1887; m. 28 Jan 1823 to Susan Mathias; 2 boys, 5 girls
  11.  Anna, b. 30 Jan 1801, d. 13 Feb 1807, Conewago PA
  12.  Joseph Jacobus [ancestor], b. 4 Oct 1803, d. 18 Sep 1878 McSherrytown PA; m. 5 Nov 1826 to Jane Rebecca McCABE; 3 girls, 6 boys. Note that Jacobus is Latin form of  James. 

On the Goshenhoppen registers there are mentions of only three other people with the Fricker surname, and they seem to be about her age or younger. And I haven't found that surname on any early passenger lists, although I certainly should look again. All I know about her is that she married, had 12 children, and over 30 grandchildren, and died. So little.

Theresa FRICKER died 20 Apr 1821, aged 60 years, at their home in McSherrytown, Adams, PA. She is clearly listed with her husband on the KUHN obelisk in the Conewago Basilica Cemetery, Adams, PA.   

Her husband, John, died 5 years later, 1 Mar 1826, apparently in Reading, Berks, PA, likely staying with one of his children, after Theresa died.  

                          === / === / === / === / === / === / === 

If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day!!

Saturday, January 23, 2021

#52Ancestors: John BRUNDAGE - c.1593-1639

The second post in the year-long challenge, #52Ancestors by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow. Today I am sharing from the LEWIS-RICE lines: John BRUNDAGE, from Aldeburgh Suffolk England to Connecticut, before 1635. A very early settler who died only a few years after arrival. This map, with all the red dots for the homes in the village at bottom on the coast, is from 1588. 

The surname BRUNDAGE can be found spelled various ways: more often as BRUNDISH,  sometimes as BRUNDWISHE. However it is spelled, this is a relatively uncomman surname, a Suffolk origin surname. Burn [stream] & edisc [pasture], and that ending of -sc is often sounded like an -sh or a soft-g sound. Where is a linguist... 

John BRUNDAGE is the 8th great-grandfather to my ex-husband, 9th to our children and their first cousin, and is 10th to our grandchildren. Because I am searching so far back, with few records surviving, the findings are suspect, although seem fairly probable. 

There is a baptism recorded [transcribed] for John BRUNDWISHE, in the Suffolk Baptism Index [1538-1911, on FindMyPast]. It states he was born in 1592, and baptised 09 Jun 1592, in Aldeburgh Suffolk England. His parents are listed as Richard BRUNDAGE and Alice. Alice's surname of WRIGHT was found online in a history, but is not proven. 

I have found only two children of Richard and Alice BRUNDAGE, born in Aldeburgh, Suffolk, England: Anne, bap 6 Sep 1590; no further research done to date; and John [ancestor], bap 9 Jun 1592, d. bef 27 Oct 1639 Wethersfield Hartford CT; m. est. 1621-26 to Rachel Hubbard

John & Rachel emigrated between 1633-1636 to Connecticut, settling in Wethersfield, Hartford, CT. He was apparently a tanner, bringing his tools with him. Their first two children were born in Suffolk, the other 3 were born in Connecticut. Their children are as follows:

    1.  Mary [ancestor], bap 10 Dec 1628, d. 15 Sep 1684, Rye Westchester
          New York; m. abt 1645 to Francis PURDY; 4 sons, 1 daughter known.
    2.  daughter, bap est 1632, d. bef 1648
    3.  John [jr], b abt/before 1636, CT, d. bef Oct 1697, Rye NY; m. Hannah;
           1 dau known, Ruth.
    4.  Bethia, b. est 1637
    5.  Posthume, b. after Oct 1639 Fairfield, CT; m. John Winter of
           Westchester NY

From the probate and note of Rachel, it seems that John died of suicide around October 1639, leaving Rachel with an unborn child, plus 4 others under 11 years of age. A challenge. The inventory taken totalled £304 6s, which would have certainly supported them for a time

A family friend Anthony Willson seems to have been guardian of the children, although I have not yet found court records. And by 5 Aug 1642, Rachel and Anthony married in Fairfield, CT. 

The PURDY family above comes down to a British Loyalist grandson, whose adult children settled in the Kingston, Frontenac, Ontario region after leaving New York.

             === / === / === / === / === / === / === 

If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day!!

Wednesday, January 13, 2021

#52ANCESTORS: Sabra TOWERS, 1805-1869 New York

This is the first post in the #52Ancestors this year, a genealogy challenge by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow. I've done several years in the past, and last year I managed about 50%. This year I'm starting the challenge with Sabra TOWERS, my 3rd great-grandmother on my mother's line. 

What do I know about Sabra-? Aside from her slightly unusual name, I do know her father is listed on the Syracuse Onondaga NY Oakwood Cemetery burial register as "S. Towers." Simon? Stephen? Samuel? Silas? Solomon?  Other possibilities? Sigh. 

Sarah TOWERS was born 22 Aug 1805 in Schaghticoke, Rensselaer, New York. Schaghticoke was originally in Albany county until 1791 when Rensselaer County was formed. Sabra married Jacob ORMSBEE about 1823-24, in Onondaga County, New York.  I'll make the assumption Sabra's parents were married in late 1700s, probably in Schaghticoke,and likely living on land bought or leased from the Albany Corporation Land. R. Beth Kloppott published "History of the Town of Schaghticoke" in 1981, and more information might be found there or in other records of these  early settlers. To find more information on Sabra's husband, search by his name in the search box on the right of this blog. 

Sabra and Jacob ORMSBEE's known children: 

  1.  Lucius Jared, b. 31 Aug 1825 Manlius NY, d. 29 Jul 1911 Syracuse NY; m. Caroline C. Combs 19 May 1847; 2 boys, 1 girl known
  2.  Harriet Philena [ancestor], b. 28 May 1827 Manlius NY, d. 20 Aug 1929, Englewood NJ; m. 26 Sep 1850 to Charles Giles GRAVES, Syracuse NY; 3 daughters [yes, she was 102 when she died]
  3.  Anna C., b. Jul 1829 Manlius NY, d. after 1910 Elbridge NY; m. 1850 to John Leary in DeWitt NY; no children
  4.  Sabra J., b. 28 Feb 1831 Van Buren NY, d. 30 Jul 1842 Baldwinsville NY. Buried in Baldwinsville, moved to family plot in Oakwood Cemetery Syracuse NY
  5.  Mary J., b. Jun 1832 Van Buren NY, d. 9 Jul 1836, Baldwinsvile NY. Buried in Baldwinsville, moved to family plot in Oakwood Cemetery Syracuse NY
The family moved from Manlius NY to Van Buren NY, to Syracuse NY, to DeWitt NY, and back to Syracuse NY.  Jacob was a well-known carpenter, and I suspect these moves were for projects he worked on. 

Her two youngest girls died quite young, the younger one Mary, died in 1836 only 4 years old. The fourth daughter - named for her mother - died in 1842, aged 11 years. I only found about these two children when I found information on the burial register for Oakwood, that they were disinterred, moved from Baldwinsville, and reburied in the family plot at Oakwood Cemetry in Syracuse. 

Sabra died in Syracuse NY, on 13 Aug 1869, only 63 years of age. She is interred in the family plot [Ormsbee/Graves] in Oakwood Cemetery. Her husband Jacob, is also buried there, after his death on 30 Mar 1893, aged 86 years.

I know nothing about Sabra's friends, her activities, or interests. Possibly I may still find more about Sabra TOWER in various articles, newspapers, or diaries. I am still hopeful, although so far I have little to show for my research! 

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If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day!!

Friday, November 27, 2020

#52Ancestors, published Letter from Dr. Louis DeBarth Kuhn, 1856

Another post in the year-long challenge, #52Ancestors by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow. I am behind, but every post is another post! Today I am sharing a letter from my great-grandfather (on my mother's paternal line), Dr. Louis DeBarth KUHN. It was published in The Republican Compiler, Gettysburg, Adams, Pennsylvania, Monday Jun 9, 1856, and is stated to be - not the entire letter - but extracts from a personal letter shared with the publisher. See newspaper banner, here. 

At this time in 1856, Dr. KUHN had already graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in Medicine and separately in Pharmacy, by 1852. He travelled at some point after his graduation to Washington Territories, settling in Port Townsend [Fort Townsend]. On January 17, 1864, he married the eldest daughter of one of the four earliest settlers of Port Townsend, Amelia "Millie" PETTYGROVE, her father Francis W. PETTYGROVE.  

The letter follows: 

     LETTER FROM THE NORTH WEST.

We have been politely favored with the perusal of an interesting letter from Dr. KUHN, of the Navy, (a native of our County [Adams]), dated on board the U.S. Revenue Cutter “Jefferson Davis,” Seattle, Puget Sound, Washington Territory, April 3d, from which we cull the following extracts:

    Here I am, safe and well, thank God, at the “seat of war,” after a pleasant voyage of a dozen days from “Merry San Francisco,” whence we sailed on the evening of the 8th of March.

        The scenery along the Sound is wild and beautiful in the extreme; the dense forests of Fir and Pine extend from the water’s edge, as far as the eye can reach, until the snow-covered mountains of the “Coast Range” look decidedly pleasant and cool in the distance.

        My first visit ashore was at Clallam Bay, where the sub-chief, “Captain Jack,” came off to tell us that his “Mamma and Papa,” as well as a number of his tribe were sick, and to ask the “Boston Doctor” to come to see them, and to give them some “medicine,” that they might get well.  I went along with him on sight, with a great deal of pleasure, and we were met on the beach by such a lot of squaws and papooses as I never saw together.

         The old chief led the way with quiet dignity to his own “wigwam,” where his wife and parents were, and afterwards to all the others; they had a number of sick, though none very seriously so, and they brought them out in the greatest confidence that the “Medicine Man” would cure them all; I wish to Heaven I could.  They live in large wooden lodges, as comfortable as they know how, and as nearly in a perfect state of nature as possible; they are very kind to each other, especially to their parents, and live upon game, fish, clams and wapatoes --(potatoes) and very good they are too.

        They are a fine looking race of men, of a light tan colour, and dark hair and eyes; the young women are handsome enough, but the old ones are anything else in the world; they do all the work and look tired and care-worn as possible. 

        I did not forget to bring my pipe and tobacco with me, and after my duties were over we had “a great smoke.”  I cannot tell you what a pleasant and interesting time it was to me, and how perfectly at home I felt in that “wigwam”; they are all “flatheads,” and I saw one little fellow about half a dozen moons old, with his head as flat as a flounder; after playing with it for a while, I asked her (the mother) if she would give it to me? but she folded her arms convulsively around it and looked as though she “could not” and would not for all the world.  “Nature is true to herself,” and she was a mother, though she was an Indian.  I would have remained longer, though it was as dark as pitch and raining like all out of doors, but it was time to go on board; they gave me some arrows, pointed with shell, that they use for shooting ducks, and with many shakes of the band, I bade good-bye to my new Indian friends.

        We passed along within sight of the British Possessions of the Hudson’s Bay Company, and anchored at Port Townsend on the 22nd. 

        This consists of about 20 wooden houses and a blockhouse, built upon the beach, and a steep bank 80 feet high, behind it -- the level of the Forest and Prairie, as far as the eye can reach, and is rather a pretty place.  There are a number of Indians here under their Head Chief, the “Duke of York,” by far the most noble specimen of his race that I have seen yet; I paid him a visit at his “wigwam,” and we soon became friends for a lifetime at least.

        The soil is good, and I went around looking at everything, and it was as pretty a sight as I ever witnessed, for it is early spring, and all nature was putting on her holiday clothes and trying to look her prettiest. 

        As I was going along, wondering why I came to such a “wooden country,” I met a man with his arm in a sling, who told me that in firing off a cannon board of a vessel, about six weeks ago, it exploded, breaking his arm, and mangling his hand, while a piece of it took off the top of his scalp, and then cut its way half through the foremast -- close shaving that.

        I asked him what had been done for his arm, and he said “Nothing.” -- I then asked to look at it, saying, “that’s my trade,: and found him about to have a useless and crippled limb for life, as I told him.  He begged me to attend to it, and I went to work, got some splint and bandages, &c.  Next morning (Easter) I went ashore, taking the Carpenter and my German friend Shrotter, to assist me.  I knew it would be very painful, and put him under the influence of chloroform; but when I began, Shrotter cleared out, swearing that he could not “stand it.”

        It was all over very soon, and I put the bones to right while he was dreaming of fighting the Indians over again, and applied the bandages.  When he awoke he cried like a child, poor fellow! and I felt very sorry for him; and his young Indian wife sat by, looking very sorrowful in her quiet grief. -- He is an intelligent, fine-looking fellow, and has lived here four or five years.  When he was more cheerful, I left him to go on board to breakfast, as the Cutter was ready to sail for this place, where we anchored on the night of the 24th.

        All the news here is about the Indian hostilities.  This town was attacked by the Indians some time ago; and, after going over the battle ground a few days ago, the wonder to me is, that they did not take the place, for they were concealed and sheltered by the timber, within gun-shot of the town, and only dislodged by the shot and shells thrown among them by the “Decatur,” after a fierce battle during an entire day.  They fight fiercely and cunningly, and are not much afraid of the “Bostons,” as they call all the Americans.

        There are a number of friendly Indians, under the care of Agents, and their Chiefs, who are fed and clothed by the government, and kept out of harm’s way upon the “Reservations,” not engaged in the war.

        This is a town containing about fifty or sixty houses, situated upon the Sound, and surrounded by the forest.  Lately this has been cut down for some distance, and a breast-work thrown around the place; and with several ships of war at anchor, ready for action at a moment’s warning, I think the Town of “Seattle” is safe.

        I think I never lived better: this is the greatest place for fish of all kinds that I have ever seen.  At one sweep of the seine, our men caught over 200 codfish.  You know I was never very fond of fish-women or fish; but a fresh salmon, or codfish, smoking before a man, ten minutes after he was swimming alongside, is sufficient to make a hungry man forget his prejudices, and forgive all his enemies.

        There are two steamers and one sloop of war here, and the officers, among whom are four surgeons, are fine fellows, and our time is spent as pleasantly as possible.

        Whilst I am writing there are twenty-five large canoes full of Indians coming across the Sound.  I think they are friendly Indians, for they are coming straight-forward, in confidence; and, if otherwise, they had better not come -- that’s all.

        On Sunday, a poor Indian scout shot himself in the arm, accidentally.  He refused to have it amputated; and is gone to the hunting-grounds of his fathers.  Poor fellow! he was brave and patient, and died without a groan.” 
                                    = / = / = / = / = / = / = / = / = / 

This ends one of the few personal writings I have seen to date of my great-grandfather, Dr. Louis DeBarth KUHN. The other is his will, which he wrote in October 1889. Other writing covered part of his first letter...Louis DeB. Kuhn.
                                    === / === / === / === / === / === / === 

If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day!!

Wednesday, November 11, 2020

WWI Roll Call, 1914-1918

 "WWI Roll Call" with basic details of the three relatives who died in "The Great War" 1914-1918. Two relatives (great-uncles) are on my GILLESPIE-BUNN side, the other on the LEWIS-RICE line.  The photo on the right is #1 below, George Armstrong Gillespie, aged 28.

1.  George Armstrong GILLESPIE, b. 1886, Barrow in Furness, Lancashire, England, d. 8 Aug 1916, France.  
The 4th and last child of George GILLESPIE & Catherine ARMSTRONG, a bachelor, he was living with his unmarried older sister, Mary, and his parents, at 44 Earle Street, Barrow, at the time he entered military service in 1914. His older two brothers, including my grandfather, were living in Canada at this time.  
George A. Gillespie died August 8, 1916, aged 32; his identifying number is R/3245, attached to the 11th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. He is buried in Hebuterne Communal Cemetery, France.  His headstone carving, as requested by his parents, is the following:
THE WICKED / CEASE FROM TROUBLING / AND THE WEARY / ARE AT REST  

2.  Thomas BUNN,  b. 12 Dec 1886, Barrow in Furness, Lancashire, England, d. 8 Oct 1917, Belgium.  
Thomas was the 4th child (of 9) of George BUNN & Sarah Elizabeth WHITEHOUSE, the brother of my grandfather Gillespie's wife. Thomas lived for a short time in Canada, following his older brother George who had immigrated in 1910.  He is a bit of a mystery and there is a story that he married or lived common-law with a woman while living in the Maritimes in Canada.  However, when war was declared, he returned to Barrow and enlisted there.  He joined the Royal Army Medical Corp, 23rd Field Ambulance, (the 7th Division). He was killed in action on 8 Oct 1917, in Belgium, and is buried in Tyne Cot Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. His name may be seen on Panel 160. (The link shows the cemetery ringed by Panels filled with approximately 35,000 names of casualties...)  

3.  Arthur Aiken LEWIS,
b. 16 Apr 1887, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada,
d. 8 May 1917, Vimy Ridge, France.

Arthur was the eldest of 8 children of Isaac Charles LEWIS & Alma Jane AIKEN. Arthur worked as a Surveyor, on Vancouver Island,as seen on 1911 Census. His CEF - Canadian Expeditionary Force - papers show he enlisted 26 Oct 1915, service number #61710, 22nd Battalion, Canadian Infantry.  There is some confusion re his death date, as the Vimy Memorial certificate provides date of death as 15/09/1916 (Sept. 15, 1916); but the official notification of his death is May 8, 1917, "in the trenches south of Acheville" which is by Vimy Ridge. The confusion has not been reconciled at this point.  

The Canadian Vimy Memorial is a remarkable construction, sitting on the Ridge itself. You can read of its design, construction, and more by clicking on this link.  

So many young men were killed in World War I.  

Lest We Forget...   
   

Thursday, October 29, 2020

#52Ancestors: Dr. Comfort STARR 1589-1659, England to Massachusetts

 Another post in the year-long challenge, #52Ancestors by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow. I am behind, but every post is another post! Today I am writing about Dr. Comfort STARR, in the RICE line of my ex-husband [and his brother], his 9th great-grandfather, our children's 10th, grandchildren's 11th great-grandfather. Online trees on various sites list several generations back plus additional children, aunts and uncles, but this is a fairly new-to-me ancestor and more research will be taken up later this year. His surname is spelled occasionally as STAR or STARRE. 

A major resource was the Ashford Parish Register, in Kent, England. Note the red ink Tudor rose under the green crown on the left side, with E and R on either side of the rose. A beautiful book with careful writing. A challenge still to read because of the way letters were formed back then, but at least they were tidy! A secondary source was the Tyler Indexes for Kent County, handwritten abstracts. Both found on FindMyPast.


Comfort STARR
was baptized 6 July 1589, in Cranbrook, Kent, England of Thomas jr. and Susan STARR. Baptism shown above. The Thomas STARR family were Dissenters, strongly Separatist re their religious practices. See St Mary the Virgin church in Ashford, here. 

Siblings of Comfort [eldest child] were Moregifte [son], William [son], Suretrust [dau], Mercie [dau], Standwell/or Standfast [dau], Judit [dau], Truth-Shall-Prevail [dau], Joyfull [son], Constance [dau], and Beloved [son].  I believe there might be one or two more children whose baptisms I have yet to find, and several died young. 

Comfort became a chirurgeon [physician/surgeon], and on Oct 4th, 1614 he married Elizabeth MITCHELL, in Northiam, Sussex, England, a nearby town.  Elizabeth was the daughter of Thomas Hayward MITCHELL and Margaret.  Comfort and Elizabeth appeared to move to Ashford, Kent, shortly after their marriage; Ashford was a bustling town with particular success in textiles manufacturing. 

The family - Comfort, wife Elizabeth, and their children plus Comfort's sister, Truth-Shall-Prevail, travelled to Massachusetts from the port of Sandwich Kent, on the Hercules in 21 Mar 1634/35. This was a time called "the Great Migration" when many people left because of extreme unhappiness with the Church of England and its "popishness" and more. It is likely that others on the ship were well-known to Comfort and his family.

Children  (10) of Comfort and Elizabeth - all but 1 were baptized in Ashford, Kent in St. Mary the Virgin; not all details of all children have been researched as yet: 
    1.  Thomas, bap 31 Dec 1616, d 25 Dec 1658 Yarmouth MA; m. abt 1639
             to Rachel Harris in Massachusetts, 3 boys known
    2.  Judith, bap 11 Jan 1617/18, d. by 25 Aug 1622, Eng.
    3.  Mary, [ancestor], bap 16 Apr 1620, d. 22 Apr 1659 Sudbury
             Middlesex, MA; m. abt 1638 to Thomas AXTELL from Berkhamstead,
             Hertfordshire, Eng; 1 known, others not yet found
    4.  Elizabeth, bap 3 Jun 1622; m. 1642 to John Fernside
    5.  Comfort [jr], bap 11 Apr 1624
    6.  John, bap 25 Oct 1626
    7  Samuell, bap 2 Mar 1627/28, d. by 16 Apr 1633, Eng.
    8.  Hanna, bap 22 Jul 1632
    9.  Liddia, bap 22 Mar 1634 
  10.  Ruth, est bap 1637 in Cambridge MA

In 1638, Dr. Comfort STARR and family removed to Duxbury, Plymouth, MA, and they resided there until 1646. He was well regarded, and was a member of the General Court in 1642. At that point, they moved to Boston, Suffolk, MA, and remained there. In addition, he was a Charter Fellow of Harvard College in 1650, and his son was also active in the College. For more information and details, I am hoping to do more research on the NEHGS site, AmericanAncestors.com, within the coming year. 

 His wife, Elizabeth, died in Boston 25 Jun 1658; by this time all children were of adult age, and several were married, as can be seen in the list of children above. 

Dr. Comfort STARR wrote out his will 22 Apr 1659, and died within the year; probate is dated 2 Jan 1659/60.    

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If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day!!

Monday, October 5, 2020

#52Ancestors: Gualter MERWIN 1593/4 - abt 1642, England

Another post in the year-long challenge, #52Ancestors by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow. I am a little behind, but every post is another post! Today I am writing about Gualter MERWIN, the father of an early New England settler to Connecticut., Miles MERWIN, who arrived before 1648. Gualter, is an old version of spelling for Walter; Merwin has been found spelled with different first vowels: Merwin, Morwin, Murwin.

Much of the information I was able to glean online came from several books: (a) The English Ancestry of the Merwin and Tinker Families of New England, 1995, v.149; pp.301-302, Douglas Richardson; and (b) The English Ancestry of Miles and Elizabeth (Powell) Merwin, published by the Miles Merwin Association. Note, the 2nd book is available to download as a pdf from FamilySearch. 

First off, I need to say I have very few verified data points for Gualter MERWIN - which is not surprising as few paper documents survive from late 1500s in England. When I started researching this family, I joined The Miles Merwin Association which provided some genealogical information - very useful. The first unverified information I have is that Gualter was baptised in Amersham, Buckinghamshire, England on 3 Mar 1593/94, naming his father as Nicholas MORWIN [variant spelling].  I have not as yet found the baptism register in Buckinghamshire online. St Mary parish church registers need to be examined.  

The  next point is Gualter's marriage in nearby New Windsor, Berkshire, England, on 12 January 1617/18, to Margaret TINKER, daughter of Robert TINKER & Ann/Agnes BERRINGTON. I found a transcription done by the Berkshire Family History Society showing the date, place, bride and groom, and the church:  St John the Baptist parish church image here is from early 1800s, before a complete rebuild in 1822.  This church is down the long road to Windsor Castle - yes, that Windsor Castle! 

Gualter and Margaret had 10 children that I have been able to find any information on, all of whom were born in New Windsor, Berkshire, England, not all baptisms found: 

    1.  Thomas, b. abt 1620, d. 28 Nov 1622
    2.  Benjamin [twin], bap 19 Nov 1621, d. 28 Nov 1622
    3.  Joseph [twin], bap 19 Nov 1621, d. 28 Nov 1622
    4.  Miles [ancestor], bap. 1 Feb 1623, d. 23 Apr 1697 Milford CT;
            m.1) abt 1647 to Elizabeth POWELL [d. 10 Jul 1664 CT], 7 children;
            m.2) abt 1664 Sarah Platt [d.15 May 1670 CT], 4 children; and, 
            m.3) 30 Nov 1670 Sara [unknown], no children.
    5.  Anthony, b. abt 1625, d. 8 Feb 1634 aged 9 
    6.  Rhoda, b. abt 1627-35
    7.  Nicholas, b. abt 1627-35
    8.  Mary, b. abt 1627-35
    9.  Sarah, b. abt 1630; m. 3 Feb 1649/50 to  John Rowlett 
  10.  Joseph, bap 20 Nov 1636, died infant.

Gualter apparently was buried 8 Feb 1642/43 in New Windsor, Berkshire.  His wife, Margaret, was buried a month later, 11 Mar 1642/43. The Prerogative Court of Canterbury Index [transcribed/typed] shows his eldest son Thomas as administrator of his estate, dated 11 March 1643.  I have not found any further information, nor his actual will, only this index. More research to be done... 

                 === / === / === / === / === / === / === 

If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day!!

Welcome!

Family, friends, and others - I hope you enjoy these pages about our ancestors and their lives. Genealogy has become somewhat of an obsession, more than a hobby, and definitely a wonderful mystery to dig into and discover. Enjoy my writing, and contact me at celia.winky at gmail dot com if you have anything to add to the stories. ... Celia Lewis