Wednesday, January 13, 2021

#52ANCESTORS: Sabra TOWERS, 1805-1869 New York

This is the first post in the #52Ancestors this year, a genealogy challenge by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow. I've done several years in the past, and last year I managed about 50%. This year I'm starting the challenge with Sabra TOWERS, my 3rd great-grandmother on my mother's line. 

What do I know about Sabra-? Aside from her slightly unusual name, I do know her father is listed on the Syracuse Onondaga NY Oakwood Cemetery burial register as "S. Towers." Simon? Stephen? Samuel? Silas? Solomon?  Other possibilities? Sigh. 

Sarah TOWERS was born 22 Aug 1805 in Schaghticoke, Rensselaer, New York. Schaghticoke was originally in Albany county until 1791 when Rensselaer County was formed. Sabra married Jacob ORMSBEE about 1823-24, in Onondaga County, New York.  I'll make the assumption Sabra's parents were married in late 1700s, probably in Schaghticoke,and likely living on land bought or leased from the Albany Corporation Land. R. Beth Kloppott published "History of the Town of Schaghticoke" in 1981, and more information might be found there or in other records of these  early settlers. To find more information on Sabra's husband, search by his name in the search box on the right of this blog. 

Sabra and Jacob ORMSBEE's known children: 

  1.  Lucius Jared, b. 31 Aug 1825 Manlius NY, d. 29 Jul 1911 Syracuse NY; m. Caroline C. Combs 19 May 1847; 2 boys, 1 girl known
  2.  Harriet Philena [ancestor], b. 28 May 1827 Manlius NY, d. 20 Aug 1929, Englewood NJ; m. 26 Sep 1850 to Charles Giles GRAVES, Syracuse NY; 3 daughters [yes, she was 102 when she died]
  3.  Anna C., b. Jul 1829 Manlius NY, d. after 1910 Elbridge NY; m. 1850 to John Leary in DeWitt NY; no children
  4.  Sabra J., b. 28 Feb 1831 Van Buren NY, d. 30 Jul 1842 Baldwinsville NY. Buried in Baldwinsville, moved to family plot in Oakwood Cemetery Syracuse NY
  5.  Mary J., b. Jun 1832 Van Buren NY, d. 9 Jul 1836, Baldwinsvile NY. Buried in Baldwinsville, moved to family plot in Oakwood Cemetery Syracuse NY
The family moved from Manlius NY to Van Buren NY, to Syracuse NY, to DeWitt NY, and back to Syracuse NY.  Jacob was a well-known carpenter, and I suspect these moves were for projects he worked on. 

Her two youngest girls died quite young, the younger one Mary, died in 1836 only 4 years old. The fourth daughter - named for her mother - died in 1842, aged 11 years. I only found about these two children when I found information on the burial register for Oakwood, that they were disinterred, moved from Baldwinsville, and reburied in the family plot at Oakwood Cemetry in Syracuse. 

Sabra died in Syracuse NY, on 13 Aug 1869, only 63 years of age. She is interred in the family plot [Ormsbee/Graves] in Oakwood Cemetery. Her husband Jacob, is also buried there, after his death on 30 Mar 1893, aged 86 years.

I know nothing about Sabra's friends, her activities, or interests. Possibly I may still find more about Sabra TOWER in various articles, newspapers, or diaries. I am still hopeful, although so far I have little to show for my research! 

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If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day!!

Friday, November 27, 2020

#52Ancestors, published Letter from Dr. Louis DeBarth Kuhn, 1856

Another post in the year-long challenge, #52Ancestors by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow. I am behind, but every post is another post! Today I am sharing a letter from my great-grandfather (on my mother's paternal line), Dr. Louis DeBarth KUHN. It was published in The Republican Compiler, Gettysburg, Adams, Pennsylvania, Monday Jun 9, 1856, and is stated to be - not the entire letter - but extracts from a personal letter shared with the publisher. See newspaper banner, here. 

At this time in 1856, Dr. KUHN had already graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in Medicine and separately in Pharmacy, by 1852. He travelled at some point after his graduation to Washington Territories, settling in Port Townsend [Fort Townsend]. On January 17, 1864, he married the eldest daughter of one of the four earliest settlers of Port Townsend, Amelia "Millie" PETTYGROVE, her father Francis W. PETTYGROVE.  

The letter follows: 

     LETTER FROM THE NORTH WEST.

We have been politely favored with the perusal of an interesting letter from Dr. KUHN, of the Navy, (a native of our County [Adams]), dated on board the U.S. Revenue Cutter “Jefferson Davis,” Seattle, Puget Sound, Washington Territory, April 3d, from which we cull the following extracts:

    Here I am, safe and well, thank God, at the “seat of war,” after a pleasant voyage of a dozen days from “Merry San Francisco,” whence we sailed on the evening of the 8th of March.

        The scenery along the Sound is wild and beautiful in the extreme; the dense forests of Fir and Pine extend from the water’s edge, as far as the eye can reach, until the snow-covered mountains of the “Coast Range” look decidedly pleasant and cool in the distance.

        My first visit ashore was at Clallam Bay, where the sub-chief, “Captain Jack,” came off to tell us that his “Mamma and Papa,” as well as a number of his tribe were sick, and to ask the “Boston Doctor” to come to see them, and to give them some “medicine,” that they might get well.  I went along with him on sight, with a great deal of pleasure, and we were met on the beach by such a lot of squaws and papooses as I never saw together.

         The old chief led the way with quiet dignity to his own “wigwam,” where his wife and parents were, and afterwards to all the others; they had a number of sick, though none very seriously so, and they brought them out in the greatest confidence that the “Medicine Man” would cure them all; I wish to Heaven I could.  They live in large wooden lodges, as comfortable as they know how, and as nearly in a perfect state of nature as possible; they are very kind to each other, especially to their parents, and live upon game, fish, clams and wapatoes --(potatoes) and very good they are too.

        They are a fine looking race of men, of a light tan colour, and dark hair and eyes; the young women are handsome enough, but the old ones are anything else in the world; they do all the work and look tired and care-worn as possible. 

        I did not forget to bring my pipe and tobacco with me, and after my duties were over we had “a great smoke.”  I cannot tell you what a pleasant and interesting time it was to me, and how perfectly at home I felt in that “wigwam”; they are all “flatheads,” and I saw one little fellow about half a dozen moons old, with his head as flat as a flounder; after playing with it for a while, I asked her (the mother) if she would give it to me? but she folded her arms convulsively around it and looked as though she “could not” and would not for all the world.  “Nature is true to herself,” and she was a mother, though she was an Indian.  I would have remained longer, though it was as dark as pitch and raining like all out of doors, but it was time to go on board; they gave me some arrows, pointed with shell, that they use for shooting ducks, and with many shakes of the band, I bade good-bye to my new Indian friends.

        We passed along within sight of the British Possessions of the Hudson’s Bay Company, and anchored at Port Townsend on the 22nd. 

        This consists of about 20 wooden houses and a blockhouse, built upon the beach, and a steep bank 80 feet high, behind it -- the level of the Forest and Prairie, as far as the eye can reach, and is rather a pretty place.  There are a number of Indians here under their Head Chief, the “Duke of York,” by far the most noble specimen of his race that I have seen yet; I paid him a visit at his “wigwam,” and we soon became friends for a lifetime at least.

        The soil is good, and I went around looking at everything, and it was as pretty a sight as I ever witnessed, for it is early spring, and all nature was putting on her holiday clothes and trying to look her prettiest. 

        As I was going along, wondering why I came to such a “wooden country,” I met a man with his arm in a sling, who told me that in firing off a cannon board of a vessel, about six weeks ago, it exploded, breaking his arm, and mangling his hand, while a piece of it took off the top of his scalp, and then cut its way half through the foremast -- close shaving that.

        I asked him what had been done for his arm, and he said “Nothing.” -- I then asked to look at it, saying, “that’s my trade,: and found him about to have a useless and crippled limb for life, as I told him.  He begged me to attend to it, and I went to work, got some splint and bandages, &c.  Next morning (Easter) I went ashore, taking the Carpenter and my German friend Shrotter, to assist me.  I knew it would be very painful, and put him under the influence of chloroform; but when I began, Shrotter cleared out, swearing that he could not “stand it.”

        It was all over very soon, and I put the bones to right while he was dreaming of fighting the Indians over again, and applied the bandages.  When he awoke he cried like a child, poor fellow! and I felt very sorry for him; and his young Indian wife sat by, looking very sorrowful in her quiet grief. -- He is an intelligent, fine-looking fellow, and has lived here four or five years.  When he was more cheerful, I left him to go on board to breakfast, as the Cutter was ready to sail for this place, where we anchored on the night of the 24th.

        All the news here is about the Indian hostilities.  This town was attacked by the Indians some time ago; and, after going over the battle ground a few days ago, the wonder to me is, that they did not take the place, for they were concealed and sheltered by the timber, within gun-shot of the town, and only dislodged by the shot and shells thrown among them by the “Decatur,” after a fierce battle during an entire day.  They fight fiercely and cunningly, and are not much afraid of the “Bostons,” as they call all the Americans.

        There are a number of friendly Indians, under the care of Agents, and their Chiefs, who are fed and clothed by the government, and kept out of harm’s way upon the “Reservations,” not engaged in the war.

        This is a town containing about fifty or sixty houses, situated upon the Sound, and surrounded by the forest.  Lately this has been cut down for some distance, and a breast-work thrown around the place; and with several ships of war at anchor, ready for action at a moment’s warning, I think the Town of “Seattle” is safe.

        I think I never lived better: this is the greatest place for fish of all kinds that I have ever seen.  At one sweep of the seine, our men caught over 200 codfish.  You know I was never very fond of fish-women or fish; but a fresh salmon, or codfish, smoking before a man, ten minutes after he was swimming alongside, is sufficient to make a hungry man forget his prejudices, and forgive all his enemies.

        There are two steamers and one sloop of war here, and the officers, among whom are four surgeons, are fine fellows, and our time is spent as pleasantly as possible.

        Whilst I am writing there are twenty-five large canoes full of Indians coming across the Sound.  I think they are friendly Indians, for they are coming straight-forward, in confidence; and, if otherwise, they had better not come -- that’s all.

        On Sunday, a poor Indian scout shot himself in the arm, accidentally.  He refused to have it amputated; and is gone to the hunting-grounds of his fathers.  Poor fellow! he was brave and patient, and died without a groan.” 
                                    = / = / = / = / = / = / = / = / = / 

This ends one of the few personal writings I have seen to date of my great-grandfather, Dr. Louis DeBarth KUHN. The other is his will, which he wrote in October 1889. Other writing covered part of his first letter...Louis DeB. Kuhn.
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If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day!!

Wednesday, November 11, 2020

WWI Roll Call, 1914-1918

 "WWI Roll Call" with basic details of the three relatives who died in "The Great War" 1914-1918. Two relatives (great-uncles) are on my GILLESPIE-BUNN side, the other on the LEWIS-RICE line.  The photo on the right is #1 below, George Armstrong Gillespie, aged 28.

1.  George Armstrong GILLESPIE, b. 1886, Barrow in Furness, Lancashire, England, d. 8 Aug 1916, France.  
The 4th and last child of George GILLESPIE & Catherine ARMSTRONG, a bachelor, he was living with his unmarried older sister, Mary, and his parents, at 44 Earle Street, Barrow, at the time he entered military service in 1914. His older two brothers, including my grandfather, were living in Canada at this time.  
George A. Gillespie died August 8, 1916, aged 32; his identifying number is R/3245, attached to the 11th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. He is buried in Hebuterne Communal Cemetery, France.  His headstone carving, as requested by his parents, is the following:
THE WICKED / CEASE FROM TROUBLING / AND THE WEARY / ARE AT REST  

2.  Thomas BUNN,  b. 12 Dec 1886, Barrow in Furness, Lancashire, England, d. 8 Oct 1917, Belgium.  
Thomas was the 4th child (of 9) of George BUNN & Sarah Elizabeth WHITEHOUSE, the brother of my grandfather Gillespie's wife. Thomas lived for a short time in Canada, following his older brother George who had immigrated in 1910.  He is a bit of a mystery and there is a story that he married or lived common-law with a woman while living in the Maritimes in Canada.  However, when war was declared, he returned to Barrow and enlisted there.  He joined the Royal Army Medical Corp, 23rd Field Ambulance, (the 7th Division). He was killed in action on 8 Oct 1917, in Belgium, and is buried in Tyne Cot Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. His name may be seen on Panel 160. (The link shows the cemetery ringed by Panels filled with approximately 35,000 names of casualties...)  

3.  Arthur Aiken LEWIS,
b. 16 Apr 1887, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada,
d. 8 May 1917, Vimy Ridge, France.

Arthur was the eldest of 8 children of Isaac Charles LEWIS & Alma Jane AIKEN. Arthur worked as a Surveyor, on Vancouver Island,as seen on 1911 Census. His CEF - Canadian Expeditionary Force - papers show he enlisted 26 Oct 1915, service number #61710, 22nd Battalion, Canadian Infantry.  There is some confusion re his death date, as the Vimy Memorial certificate provides date of death as 15/09/1916 (Sept. 15, 1916); but the official notification of his death is May 8, 1917, "in the trenches south of Acheville" which is by Vimy Ridge. The confusion has not been reconciled at this point.  

The Canadian Vimy Memorial is a remarkable construction, sitting on the Ridge itself. You can read of its design, construction, and more by clicking on this link.  

So many young men were killed in World War I.  

Lest We Forget...   
   

Thursday, October 29, 2020

#52Ancestors: Dr. Comfort STARR 1589-1659, England to Massachusetts

 Another post in the year-long challenge, #52Ancestors by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow. I am behind, but every post is another post! Today I am writing about Dr. Comfort STARR, in the RICE line of my ex-husband [and his brother], his 9th great-grandfather, our children's 10th, grandchildren's 11th great-grandfather. Online trees on various sites list several generations back plus additional children, aunts and uncles, but this is a fairly new-to-me ancestor and more research will be taken up later this year. His surname is spelled occasionally as STAR or STARRE. 

A major resource was the Ashford Parish Register, in Kent, England. Note the red ink Tudor rose under the green crown on the left side, with E and R on either side of the rose. A beautiful book with careful writing. A challenge still to read because of the way letters were formed back then, but at least they were tidy! A secondary source was the Tyler Indexes for Kent County, handwritten abstracts. Both found on FindMyPast.


Comfort STARR
was baptized 6 July 1589, in Cranbrook, Kent, England of Thomas jr. and Susan STARR. Baptism shown above. The Thomas STARR family were Dissenters, strongly Separatist re their religious practices. See St Mary the Virgin church in Ashford, here. 

Siblings of Comfort [eldest child] were Moregifte [son], William [son], Suretrust [dau], Mercie [dau], Standwell/or Standfast [dau], Judit [dau], Truth-Shall-Prevail [dau], Joyfull [son], Constance [dau], and Beloved [son].  I believe there might be one or two more children whose baptisms I have yet to find, and several died young. 

Comfort became a chirurgeon [physician/surgeon], and on Oct 4th, 1614 he married Elizabeth MITCHELL, in Northiam, Sussex, England, a nearby town.  Elizabeth was the daughter of Thomas Hayward MITCHELL and Margaret.  Comfort and Elizabeth appeared to move to Ashford, Kent, shortly after their marriage; Ashford was a bustling town with particular success in textiles manufacturing. 

The family - Comfort, wife Elizabeth, and their children plus Comfort's sister, Truth-Shall-Prevail, travelled to Massachusetts from the port of Sandwich Kent, on the Hercules in 21 Mar 1634/35. This was a time called "the Great Migration" when many people left because of extreme unhappiness with the Church of England and its "popishness" and more. It is likely that others on the ship were well-known to Comfort and his family.

Children  (10) of Comfort and Elizabeth - all but 1 were baptized in Ashford, Kent in St. Mary the Virgin; not all details of all children have been researched as yet: 
    1.  Thomas, bap 31 Dec 1616, d 25 Dec 1658 Yarmouth MA; m. abt 1639
             to Rachel Harris in Massachusetts, 3 boys known
    2.  Judith, bap 11 Jan 1617/18, d. by 25 Aug 1622, Eng.
    3.  Mary, [ancestor], bap 16 Apr 1620, d. 22 Apr 1659 Sudbury
             Middlesex, MA; m. abt 1638 to Thomas AXTELL from Berkhamstead,
             Hertfordshire, Eng; 1 known, others not yet found
    4.  Elizabeth, bap 3 Jun 1622; m. 1642 to John Fernside
    5.  Comfort [jr], bap 11 Apr 1624
    6.  John, bap 25 Oct 1626
    7  Samuell, bap 2 Mar 1627/28, d. by 16 Apr 1633, Eng.
    8.  Hanna, bap 22 Jul 1632
    9.  Liddia, bap 22 Mar 1634 
  10.  Ruth, est bap 1637 in Cambridge MA

In 1638, Dr. Comfort STARR and family removed to Duxbury, Plymouth, MA, and they resided there until 1646. He was well regarded, and was a member of the General Court in 1642. At that point, they moved to Boston, Suffolk, MA, and remained there. In addition, he was a Charter Fellow of Harvard College in 1650, and his son was also active in the College. For more information and details, I am hoping to do more research on the NEHGS site, AmericanAncestors.com, within the coming year. 

 His wife, Elizabeth, died in Boston 25 Jun 1658; by this time all children were of adult age, and several were married, as can be seen in the list of children above. 

Dr. Comfort STARR wrote out his will 22 Apr 1659, and died within the year; probate is dated 2 Jan 1659/60.    

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If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day!!

Monday, October 5, 2020

#52Ancestors: Gualter MERWIN 1593/4 - abt 1642, England

Another post in the year-long challenge, #52Ancestors by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow. I am a little behind, but every post is another post! Today I am writing about Gualter MERWIN, the father of an early New England settler to Connecticut., Miles MERWIN, who arrived before 1648. Gualter, is an old version of spelling for Walter; Merwin has been found spelled with different first vowels: Merwin, Morwin, Murwin.

Much of the information I was able to glean online came from several books: (a) The English Ancestry of the Merwin and Tinker Families of New England, 1995, v.149; pp.301-302, Douglas Richardson; and (b) The English Ancestry of Miles and Elizabeth (Powell) Merwin, published by the Miles Merwin Association. Note, the 2nd book is available to download as a pdf from FamilySearch. 

First off, I need to say I have very few verified data points for Gualter MERWIN - which is not surprising as few paper documents survive from late 1500s in England. When I started researching this family, I joined The Miles Merwin Association which provided some genealogical information - very useful. The first unverified information I have is that Gualter was baptised in Amersham, Buckinghamshire, England on 3 Mar 1593/94, naming his father as Nicholas MORWIN [variant spelling].  I have not as yet found the baptism register in Buckinghamshire online. St Mary parish church registers need to be examined.  

The  next point is Gualter's marriage in nearby New Windsor, Berkshire, England, on 12 January 1617/18, to Margaret TINKER, daughter of Robert TINKER & Ann/Agnes BERRINGTON. I found a transcription done by the Berkshire Family History Society showing the date, place, bride and groom, and the church:  St John the Baptist parish church image here is from early 1800s, before a complete rebuild in 1822.  This church is down the long road to Windsor Castle - yes, that Windsor Castle! 

Gualter and Margaret had 10 children that I have been able to find any information on, all of whom were born in New Windsor, Berkshire, England, not all baptisms found: 

    1.  Thomas, b. abt 1620, d. 28 Nov 1622
    2.  Benjamin [twin], bap 19 Nov 1621, d. 28 Nov 1622
    3.  Joseph [twin], bap 19 Nov 1621, d. 28 Nov 1622
    4.  Miles [ancestor], bap. 1 Feb 1623, d. 23 Apr 1697 Milford CT;
            m.1) abt 1647 to Elizabeth POWELL [d. 10 Jul 1664 CT], 7 children;
            m.2) abt 1664 Sarah Platt [d.15 May 1670 CT], 4 children; and, 
            m.3) 30 Nov 1670 Sara [unknown], no children.
    5.  Anthony, b. abt 1625, d. 8 Feb 1634 aged 9 
    6.  Rhoda, b. abt 1627-35
    7.  Nicholas, b. abt 1627-35
    8.  Mary, b. abt 1627-35
    9.  Sarah, b. abt 1630; m. 3 Feb 1649/50 to  John Rowlett 
  10.  Joseph, bap 20 Nov 1636, died infant.

Gualter apparently was buried 8 Feb 1642/43 in New Windsor, Berkshire.  His wife, Margaret, was buried a month later, 11 Mar 1642/43. The Prerogative Court of Canterbury Index [transcribed/typed] shows his eldest son Thomas as administrator of his estate, dated 11 March 1643.  I have not found any further information, nor his actual will, only this index. More research to be done... 

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If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day!!

Sunday, September 6, 2020

#52Ancestors: John Lewis AIKEN, 1823-1861, Kingston ON

Another in the year-long challenge, #52Ancestors by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow. I am a little behind, but every post is another post! Today I am writing about John Lewis AIKEN, in the LEWIS-RICE lines. And no, John's middle name does not make him a Lewis-line relative... 


John Lewis AIKEN was the 3rd of 11 children of Robert AIKEN & Martha PURDY - Martha being the granddaughter of the United Empire Loyalist, Gilbert PURDY, sr.  The link to my blog on Gilbert may be found here.  Note that the surname is often spelled AKIN or AKINS, but in this particular line, by the late 1800s it seems to have settled into AIKEN. The Aiken line goes back to Londonderry, Northern Ireland, with the first settler, Edward AIKEN sr & wife Barbara EDWARDS arriving before 1722. The families settled in Londonderry, New Hampshire, moving to Kingston Ontario, before 1818. 

On the 1842 Census of Canada West, ON, his father Robert Akins is shown as a Farmer. This census did not list family members, nor how many people were in the household. Thank heavens for the 1851/52 Census which listed everyone, including a married daughter, visiting from her home in Loughborough, a nearby township. 


On March 2, 1853, John Lewis AIKEN married Eliza Jane BAKER in Kingston ON. Unfortunately I have not found a marriage online - Ronald Makin Family Records [UEL} has a copy of their Kingston ON marriage certificate. Note Ontario began civil registration in 1869.

Children of John & Eliza are the following four, born in the region around Kingston ON: 
    1.  Robert Edwin, b. 23 Dec 1853; m. 9 Nov 1881 to Frances E. Ely;
              6 children
    2.  Alma Jane [ancestor], b. 28 May 1858, d. 11 Dec 1954 Vancouver
              BC; m.1st to Melancton Odell Andrews, 1 dau; m.2nd to 3 Dec 1885
              in Winnipeg MB to Isaac Charles LEWIS; 7 children
    3.  Charles C., b. abt 1860
    4.  Minnie C., b. abt 1861; m. Archie Thompson
    
John died unexpectedly, aged only 38 years, on Feb 16, 1861, leaving his wife with 4 very young children. I have not found his cause of death. Nor have I found his burial place, but it is likely in Kingston ON.

His widow, Eliza Jane, married John's older brother, Peter Clark Aiken, aka Clark, on July 1st, 1862, in Kingston. They had 2 girls:
    1.  Annie E., b. 1865, Kingston
    2.  Mary C., b. 1867, Kingston. 

It is clear that I need to dig deeper for more details of John Lewis AIKEN, perhaps in local newspapers in Kingston, directories, land records. I would like to have more information on his wife Eliza as well. I have a to-do list. Also I was surprised to see Eliza married her deceased husband's older brother. I have seen that type of intermarriage only once before. 

               === / === / === / === / === / === / === 

If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day!!

Monday, August 17, 2020

#52Ancestors: James PERRY, 1875-1966, England

Continuing the #52Ancestors year-long challenge by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow, here is my son-in-law's great-grandfather, James PERRY, born in Hartshill, Warwickshire, England.  The photo is apparently of James' father, John PERRY, jr.  

James, born in 1875 in Hartshill, Warwick, was the youngest of the 9 children of his parents, John PERRY jr & Sarah WHITE. His father worked as a hand-looming ribbon-weaver according to the 1841 Census, as did many others on the Census pages for Hartshill, a small hamlet. This was a fading occupation as mechanized looms began to take over the piece-work done on home looms. 

On Aug 2, 1898, James married Martha Jane DONAGHY, in Glasgow, Scotland. The certificate states both are working, James as a Coachman, Martha as a Restaurant Hostess.  Scottish marriage certificates are wonderfully detailed with names of both parents, their occupations, and mother's maiden name.  See below: 

The 1901 Census in Glasgow shows James working as an Iron Foundry Labourer, living in the parish of Townhead, with a number of other workers from Ireland. Here we see their first daughter, Lillian, 2 yrs old. I suspect the Foundry paid fairly well - and there were pages of Foundries listed in the Glasgow city Directory!! 


James and Martha had the following 5 known children:
   1.  Lillian Martha, b. Mar 23, 1899, Glasgow

   2.  John Robert, b. May 13, 1901, Glasgow

   3.  James Edward [ancestor], b. abt 1904, Hartshill, Warwick;
          m. Oct 6, 1928 Alberta Canada to Margaret Alice
          ATHERTON
; 7 children

   4.  Ralph, b. Oct 1907, Hartshill, Warwick, d. Mar 1990
           Warwickshire

   5.  Edwin, b. Oct 1909, Warwickshire

As can be seen above, before 1904 James and Martha moved down to the hamlet of Hartshill in Warwickshire where his parents and some of his siblings were living. On the 1911 Census, James states his occupation as Inn Keeper - see image below of the Bowling Green Inn on Coventry Rd in Southam. Here in this photo one can also see that it is still open for business.

I do wonder how James came to be an Innkeeper, having worked in various servant or labouring jobs until this time. Southam is south of the large city of Coventry; Hartshill where he and his younger three children were born, is just north of Southam, a total of almost 25 miles between the two places. Perhaps there's a family story about his new opportunity, between 1909 and 1911.  

I have yet to do significant research on James' children other than for his namesake, James Edward PERRY. Clearly some research could be done by his descendants-?  

At the age of 91 years, James died April 1st 1966, in Nuneaton, Warwickshire, and is apparently buried there. His wife, Martha, died 2 years later aged 93 years, on May 11, 1968, in Staffordshire.  There have been several trips to England, and perhaps one of the great-grandchildren have photos of their gravestones. 

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If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day!!

Monday, August 10, 2020

#52Ancestors: Jane Rebecca McCABE, 1803-1883

Another in the year-long challenge, #52Ancestors by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow. I am a little behind, but every post is another post! This week I am writing about Jane Rebecca McCABE, my 2nd great-grandmother on my mother's KUHN line, 3rd great-grandmother to my children, 4th to my grandchildren. 

Jane,  born Oct 25, 1803 in Morgantown, Pennsylvania, was the youngest of the three children of Edward McCABE from County Monaghan & Rebecca HUDSON.

Jane married Joseph Jacobus KUHN (1803-1878) on Nov 5, 1826 in the Conewago Chapel, Conewago, Adams, Pennsylvania. The service was presided over by the Reverend DeBarth. There is a lovely image of the KUHN obelisk in the Conewago Chapel cemetery, listing many of the Kuhn ancestors, siblings, their marriages, etc.

Children of Joseph & Jane, all born in East Berlin, Adams, PA: 

   1.  Edward John, b. 23 Sep 1827, d. 25 Feb 1906 Hanover PA; m. abt 1856
          in Missouri 1st Annie P. Gill [d.1862], 3 children; m. 2nd Sarah Jane
          Hilt, abt 1870 in PA, 6 children
   2.  Dr. Louis/Lewis DeBarth, Ancestor, b. 22 Oct 1829, d. 7 May 1908
            NY; m. 17 Jan 1864 to Amelia A PETTYGROVE [d. 1888], 10
            children
   3.  Sarah Jane, b. 25 Dec 1831, d. 29 Apr 1834. 
   4.  Maria Rebecca, b. 2 Feb 1834, d. 8 Nov 1857 in Cuba on honeymoon;
            m. 1857 to Charles F. Leisen.
   5.  Charles Edmund, b. 16 Nov 1836, d. 23 Nov 1909 in Denver CO;
            m. 1862 to Jennie M. Myers; 1 daughter
   6.  Jane Elizabeth, b. 5 Feb 1839, d. 8 Jun 1916; m. abt 1865 to Philip
            Reilly, 5 children
   7.  Joseph Augustine, b. 1 Sep 1841, d. 4 Oct 1918 Port Townsend WA
   8.  John Randolph, b. 28 Aug 1844, d. 2 Nov 1926; m. 13 Feb 1870
             Brooklyn NY to Henrietta M. Rabitte; 13 children
   9.  Dr. George Richard Montgomery, b. 2 Sep 1847, d. 5 Nov 1915
             Brooklyn NY; m. 13 Nov 1879 to Mary E. Hussey; 5 children

Unfortunately there is nothing further I have found about Jane Rebecca, aside from her having borne 9 children in 20 years. I have newspapers to search soon, hoping for any obituary write up on her. Her husband, Joseph J KUHN, died 18 Sep 1878, aged 74, in McSherrytown, Adams, PA. Five years later, she died 15 June 1883 in Brooklyn NY, aged 79 years.

She is listed on the very large KUHN obelisk with her husband, showing her maiden name - a treasure when I found this image.  


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If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day!!

Saturday, August 8, 2020

#52Ancestors: Joseph WHITEHEAD, 1716-1781, Virginia/NC, USA

Another in the year-long challenge, #52Ancestors by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow. I am a little behind, but every post is another post! This week I am writing about the little I have found on my ex-husband's 5th Great-Grandfather, Joseph WHITEHEAD; 6th great-grandfather to my children, 7th to my grandchildren
Much of my information on this family came mainly from an online genealogy/descendancy site on Sumner County Tennessee settlers on Rootsweb, following Whitehead settlers from Virginia and North Carolina. A number of Whitehead men show up on Virginia Land Records indexes in the late 1600s and into the 1700s, including Richard, Thomas, John, Arthur, and William. However I am unable to access the actual record images at this point, which might assist in finding any possible relationships between the individuals, and to place Joseph and his parents more specifically in Isle of Wight county, Virginia. .

Born in [est] 1714 in Isle of Wight, Virginia, USA, apparently Joseph [and parents?] moved to settle in Edgecombe County, North Carolina when he was a young child. Joseph apparently married Faith LANE in North Carolina, likely about 1735 when he would have been 21 years of age, Faith 20 years. Her father is sometimes listed as Benjamin Lane [not verified as yet]. Some genealogies/trees state that Faith died much later, marrying a second time to William Bynum. Confusion reigns. 

Three children were born in Edgecombe county, North Carolina:
   1.  Benjamin, b. abt 1736
   2.  Mary, ancestor, b. 1 July 1738, d. abt 1773; m. abt 1762 to Matthew
            JOYNER
, 4 children
   3.  Joseph jr., b. abt 1740

Four other possible children have been connected to Joseph sr: Tobias, John, Martha, and Elizabeth.  However I do not feel confident here, as it also appears that trees and histories mix the two Josephs' details, marriages, other children. On the other hand, they may indeed be Joseph & Faith's children. 

Joseph's wife, Faith, died in May 1752, in Edgecombe co., North Carolina. He married a second time, to Pheribe Applewhaite [a fascinating name], in 1771, in Halifax North Carolina. Apparently no children were born to them. Pheribe would have been over 40 yrs. His children by Faith,were adults by the time he married Pheribe. 

Joseph died 17 Feb 1781 in Halifax, Halifax Co., North Carolina. His will names his wife Pheriby, and the 4 children mentioned above. There is no mention of the first two male children Benjamin & Joseph jr.  This confusion might indicate that the will is actually for his son, Joseph Jr.  At this point, I am assuming that Joseph WHITEHEAD sr, and Faith LANE his first wife, may NOT be valid, and/or may have been confused with others of the same name. The daughter [listed above] - Mary, who married Matthew JOYNER - has additional records on her marriage and children so support that her father was Joseph. Their first child's name was Benjamin Joyner.  

As can be seen, Joseph's history is scant and poorly substantiated.  More research on the websites of the Library of Virginia, as well as in the Virginia Historical Society, is necessary. My to-do list is long on this Whitehead family line. 

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If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day!!

Monday, July 20, 2020

#52Ancestors: Hannah BROOKS, 1726-1759, Connecticut

Another in the year-long challenge, #52Ancestors by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow. I am a little behind, but every post is another post!  Here I am writing about  my 5th great-grandmother on my maternal TERWILLIGER line:  Hannah BROOKS, born in Wallingford CT

Hannah was the eldest child of Stephen BROOKS & Hannah BARNES, and was born April 5, 1726 in Wallingford, New Haven, Connecticut. Siblings were Stephen jr (1728), Jerusha (1731),  Martha (1735), Thomas (1738), Lois (1740, and Abraham (1743).  The first BROOKS immigrant seems to have been Henry BROOKS, who married in 1676 in Wallingford. Hannah would be the 4th Brooks generation in Connecticut.

Hannah's first husband was John Clark, (1727-1749), whom she married Sep 9, 1747 in Waterbury Connecticut. Their child was John Clark jr, born May 11, 1748; her husband John died Oct 1, 1749 scarcely 5 months later. 

On May 1st, 1751, Hannah married Cornelius GRAVES (1724-1812), in Waterbury. Cornelius was a farmer, owning a "considerable amount of land at New Cambridge," paying taxes 1749-1776. For information and genealogy details of the GRAVES line, The Graves Family Association online shows the first immigrant John GRAVES (abt 1605-after 1650), #166 in the numerous Graves lines listed on this site.  

Hannah and Cornelius had 4 sons:
    1.  Stephen Wells [ancestor], b. Feb 2, 1752, East Plymouth, CT, d. Jun 6, 1828 Harwinton CT; m. Dec 8 1778 in Harwinton CT to Ruth JEROME; 7 children.
   2.  Benjamin, b. Mar 12, 1754 New Hartford CT d. Nov 29 1836 Perrysville NY; m. Aug 15, 1776 in Durham CT to Eunice [Jerusha] Hale; 3 children known.
   3.  Cornelius jr, b. Mar 1756 in New Hartford CT, d. Oct 7 1781 in the Revolutionary War. 
   4.  Jacob, b. Sep 1, 1758, New Hartford CT, d. 26 Nov 1758. 

I'm uncertain why their eldest child was the only one to be given a second name, Wells. It keeps niggling at me to do more research on this issue. 

As you can see, Hannah's 4th son died Nov 26, 1758, scarcely 3 months old.  At aged 33 years, Hannah died the week before Jacob, on Nov 14, 1759, in Waterbury CT.  She is apparently buried in Green Hill Cemetery, in Bristol, Hartford, CT.

Cornelius married for a second time on Aug 13, 1761, to Phebe Prindle (1733-1821), and had one more son, also named Jacob, b. Jul 12, 1762, likely born in New Cambridge CT. 

As is sometimes the case, there is little information on the women in this time period.  Their birth, their parents, marriage, and death: with possible dates/places. I found a few more details this time through several websites [including Amazon, AmericanAncestors, FindMyPast, FamilySearch], but of course there are other sources I also need to dig deeper in - archives, town clerks, and more. 

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If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day!!

Wednesday, July 8, 2020

#52Ancestors: Thomas PICKTON, 1791-1853, Cheshire England

Continuing the #52Ancestors year-long challenge by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow, here is Thomas PICKTON in the PERRY line, a 4th great-grandfather to my son-in-law, 5th to his children. 

It is rather challenging finding details of Thomas' life in and around Weaverham Parish in Cheshire in the west of England. I have a possible christening, a marriage, a death. I'm comfortably sure of his spouse, and their names on the 6 children's christenings.  But there are very sparse details of his and his family's daily lives, interests, social network, and so on. 

Thomas was born about 1791 in Cuddington, a hamlet which had about 200 inhabitants in 1800. In searching the Parish Register for the region, I have only found his children's baptisms, and his marriage. No Picktons before that time - although I did find one William Pickton in early-mid 1600s in Whitegate a few miles away with a small family. For Thomas and his family, census records of 1841 and 1851 provided additional information of birth county, estimated age.

Thomas, a farmer, married Mary SAVAGE, daughter of George SAVAGE & Hannah LEE [not yet verified], on August 6th, 1811, in the village of Frodsham, in her parish church, St Laurence Church.   

They had 7 children that I have been able to find in the Parish Registers for Weaverham, which covers Cuddington. Not all life details have been found as yet for each child. 
All were born in Cuddington:
    1.  Mary, bap 30 May 1813; m. abt 1839 to William Podmore, 1 dau known
    2.  John, est 1816
    3.  Elizabeth, bap 12 Jul 1818; m. Jun 15, 1854 to James Gaskins [widower]
    4.  Hannah/Ann [ancestor], bap Feb 11, 1821, d. Nov 27, 1889,;
              m. Dec 239 Dec 1841 to George BOSTOCK sr.; 8 children
    5.  Thomas [jr], bap Jun 8, 1823
    6.  Sarah, bap Feb 12, 1826
    7.  Ellen, bap Feb 14, 1830; m. Mar 6, 1855 to Jesse Moss; 3 daughters

I managed to find a note that there was a two-storey grammar schoolhouse* in Weaverham, which may mean their children attended. Perhaps they all were able to do basic reading, writing, and arithmetic perhaps along with a few other topics such as history. I noticed that the 7th child, Ellen, signed her name at her marriage in 1855, while her mother had only made her mark at her marriage in 1811. (*Some Aspects of Education in Cheshire in the Eighteenth Century, by Derek Robson, pp134-135.) 

 Thomas died Aug 12, 1853 and his death was registered in Northwich, Cheshire.  His wife Mary, died a few years later, in 1859, registered in Northwich. It is possible that they were living with one of their children in Northwich, with either/both of their sons taking over the farm at this time. More research to do.  

PICKTON is not a common name at all in this parish in the 1700s and early 1800s, and rare or absent in nearby parishes. It is possible that Thomas moved to this parish as a young man, perhaps for work on a farm, and stayed. So many possibilities. So little actually known.
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If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day!!

Thursday, June 18, 2020

#52Ancestors: James BEEBE ~1641-1728

Continuing the #52Ancestors year-long challenge by genealogist Amy Johnson Crow, here is another very early immigrant to Connecticut, James BEEBE. James and his wife, Mary BOLTWOOD, are my 8th great-grandparents on my mother's line, 9th to my children, and 10th to my grandchildren. 

James was apparently born in Broughton, Northampton, in about 1641. Although I have been able to find the baptisms of all his siblings, I have not found James' baptism. 

His parents were John BEEBE & Rebecca LADD, and James was the youngest of the 8 children.  In May of 1650, on the voyage from England to Connecticut, both his father and mother died. Two of his siblings were aged 20 and 22, and apparently took on the responsibility of raising their siblings. By March of 1651, the Beebe family appear to have joined with the Rev. Blinman, and settled in New London, CT. Several appear to have moved to Hadley, MA. after a time.

 "A Monograph of the Descent of the Family of BEEBE, from the earliest known immigrant -- John, of Broughton, England, 1650" compiled by Clarence Beebe, of New York., John BEEBE's will, and other histories and registers, provided most of the information I have on James BEEBE.  On page 15 of the Monograph mentioned, it is stated that he was apprenticed to Thomas Stanley until he was 25 years old, i.e., in 1666. I was unable to find documents detailing the skills he was to be learning during that apprenticeship.

A year after his apprenticeship ended, on 24 Oct 1667, James married Mary BOLTWOOD, daughter of Robert BOLTWOOD and Mary GERNOR, in Hadley, Hampshire, MA.  Mary had been born in Massachusetts in 1646; she was the eldest of the five known Boltwood children. 

James and Mary had the following children, all born in Hadley MA:
   1.  Mary, b. 1668, .
   2.  James jr., b. 1669, d. 1670, Hadley
   3.  Rebecca, bap. 9 Dec 1670
   4.  Samuel [ancestor], bap 26 Jun 1672, d. 1731 Litchfield CT; m. 1698 in Wethersfield CT to Hannah ORCUTT; 8 children 

His wife, Mary, died on 19 Aug 1676 in Hadley, Hampshire, MA, leaving James with 4 children under 8 years old.  On 19 Dec 1679, James married for a second time, to Sarah Benydicke [Benedict] in Norwalk, Connecticut; no further children from this marriage.  I have no information on Sarah and her parents, whether she was a widow at the time, nor when she died. However two Benedict men were 2 of the earliest settlers of Danbury, and she is likely related to them.

I have just found a bit of history of the first settlers in Danbury, 8 men and their families, including James BEEBE. Click on this LINK to read more about this early history.  

In Danbury, James held a number of positions: "Commissioner in 1691, a Lieutenant in 1696, a Justice of the Peace for many years from 1698, a Deputy to the General Assembly in 1710, and Captain of the Train Band, from 1716." [from the Monograph mentioned above]  All those details seem to indicate he was well thought of, and respected in the community.

James died 22 Apr 1728, 87 years of age, in Danbury, Fairfield county, CT, and is buried in Danbury, but the cemetery is not known. A gravestone was mentioned in a centennial sermon in Danbury, but it is not visible. 

I am still researching this BEEBE immigrant from England, and hopefully I will find more information about his occupation and other social-political events that may have influenced the family.  

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If these are your ancestors, I am happy to share what little I have on these ancestors. And if there are errors, please do let me know, via calewis at telus dot net, or in the Comments below and I will get back to you either by email or in the Comments. I appreciate the opportunity to correct any issues in these family trees.

Blogger - or my computer - is still not letting me "reply" to your comments, for some unknown reason. If I don't reply to your Comment, please know that I'm totally thrilled you came to read my post and commented!  You truly make my day!!

Welcome!

Family, friends, and others - I hope you enjoy these pages about our ancestors and their lives. Genealogy has become somewhat of an obsession, more than a hobby, and definitely a wonderful mystery to dig into and discover. Enjoy my writing, and contact me at celia.winky at gmail dot com if you have anything to add to the stories. ... Celia Lewis